Introduction to Strength Training

An Introduction to Strength Training

Looking to boost your metabolism, increase your strength, and enhance your mental clarity? Enter strength training. When incorporated regularly into your workout routine, strength training can provide many benefits. Let’s explore the basic concepts of strength training and how you can maximize the results and benefits it provides.

What is Strength Training?

Strength training (also known as resistance training) is a form of exercise focused on gaining muscle mass, building strength, and increasing endurance. Strength training encompasses a wide variety of exercises, using bodyweight or equipment, with a focus on building muscle mass in all major muscle groups – upper body, lower body, and core.

Strength training has many forms. Bodyweight exercises like lunges, squats, push ups, and planks are examples of strength training, as are movements that incorporate kettlebells and dumbbells. Resistance and weight machines like leg press, chest press, cables, leg abductors, and pull up machines can all be incorporated into a strength training workout.

Maximizing Results from Strength Training

Warming up your muscles through dynamic stretching before engaging in strength training is important for maximizing your workouts and avoiding injury. Also essential in avoiding injury is proper rest and recovery between strength training sessions. In order to allow muscle recovery between more intense workouts, workout “splits” (focusing on one main muscle group per workout and alternating between them in a pattern) can be beneficial. Regardless of workout intensity, proper stretching and refueling post-workout will assist in muscle growth and recovery.

Health Benefits of Strength Training

The most obvious benefit of strength training is an increase in muscle mass and a toned physique, but this form of exercise also helps build bone density and joint flexibility. Strength training may also be ideal for fat loss as increased muscle mass leads to a higher resting metabolic rate (calories burned at rest). Along with physical benefits, engaging in consistent exercise like strength training contributes to overall health (better sleep!) and mental clarity.

Strength training may seem intimidating at first, but it is a beneficial practice for people at all skill and strength levels. If you’re new to strength training, start with smaller weights or lower reps and increase gradually as you build strength and confidence. Make sure to focus on your warm up, practice proper form, and allow time for recovery to decrease your soreness and maximize your results.

See all the strength training classes we offer at ​yogafevergr.com/classes/strength/

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Benefits of Cardio Exercise

Benefits of Cardio Exercise

Cardiovascular exercise (“cardio”), or aerobic exercise, is fundamental for health and overall well being. Aerobic just means “with oxygen,” so any exercise that gets your body moving and your breath heavy can be cardio exercise. These exercises that increase our heart rate help to increase our aerobic capacity (how well we can use our oxygen) and offer numerous benefits for our heart and overall physical health. Let’s explore what these benefits are and see why cardio is so important.

Benefits of Cardio Exercise

You might gather this from the name, but yes, regular cardiovascular exercise improves overall cardiovascular health! This helps to reduce risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Regular physical activity also helps regulate blood sugar and strengthens our immune system.

Cardio exercise is often associated with weight loss, and it’s true that the blood-pumping, heart-racing, heavy-breathing state burns serious calories. Compared to most other forms of exercise (like weight lifting, yoga, or pilates), cardio does burn more calories per session. And unless you’re doing vigorous high-impact workouts, cardio doesn’t require the same recovery period as strength training or weight lifting, so it can be incorporated into your daily routine with ease. When paired with a healthy diet, frequent cardio exercise can be a great strategy for losing weight in a healthy way.

Cardio isn’t just good for your heart—it’s also great for your mind. Cardio exercise sends endorphins to your brain that will leave you feeling happier (think “runner’s high”) and reduce stress, leading to increased energy during the day and more restful sleep at night. Regular cardio can even improve memory capacity and help fight against the loss of brain tissue that comes with aging.

Examples of Cardio Exercise

Convinced yet? If you’re ready to start incorporating cardio into your routine, the good news is that most forms of cardio are simple and free. Examples of cardio exercise include:

  • Brisk walking or running
  • Swimming
  • Indoor cycling and outdoor bike riding
  • HIIT or high intensity interval training
  • Elliptical or stair climber
  • Jumping rope
  • Dancing
  • Sports such as soccer, volleyball, basketball, etc.

Because the key to a healthy routine is long-term sustainability, be open to experimenting with various forms of cardio exercise until you find an activity that you truly enjoy (dance party, anyone?).

If you’re ready to experience the physical and mental benefits of cardio exercise, join us for an indoor cycling class: yogafevergr.com/classes/schedule/

what is Buti yoga anyway?

What is Buti Yoga Anyway?

Do you ever have a sudden urge to throw on your favorite song and dance around the room? Are you tired of putting yourself through grueling workout sessions just to lose weight? Are you ready to experiment with a fierce new combination of yoga, strength, and cardio?

If this sounds like you, wait until you learn about BUTI yoga. It will rock your world!

WHAT IS BUTI YOGA?

BUTI yoga is a unique practice, known for it’s cardio-intensive bursts of tribal dance, primal movement, and conditioning. Created by celebrity trainer Bizzie Gold, it’s designed to offer a calorie-scorching, body-sculpting, and dynamic yoga practice.

I’m not going to lie. When I first heard about BUTI yoga, I was intimidated. It sounds intense, right? But once I learned more, and watched a few videos, I discovered I was really intrigued to try this soulful and playful form of exercise.

The word ‘buti’ is a Marathi Indian term for “the cure to something that’s been hidden away or kept secret.” The movement involved in a BUTI class is designed to help everyone develop body confidence. It will help you fall in love with your workout, break through emotional and physical barriers, and transform your body.

WHAT ARE THE PHYSICAL BENEFITS OF BUTI?

As I mentioned, BUTI yoga is a physically-demanding sweat session. Yet, it’s approachable for all-levels. Just as in our regular yoga classes, you’ll begin where you are and grow at your own pace.

In a BUTI class, you can expect explosive movements, a quick pace, killer ab sequences, and lots of upbeat music – there’s nothing dainty about this practice! However, it will allow you to kick all that repetitive weight lifting, sit-ups, and elliptical work to the curb. The infectious group energy, filled with hoots, hollers, and lots of movement, will carry you through the experience.

HOW IS BUTI UNIQUE?

In Bizzie Gold’s creation, the signature strengthening approach is called Spiral Structure Technique (SST). The major movements you’ll do in BUTI are designed to activate all of the abdominal muscle groups. While most crunches and ab exercises only target the front part of the core, the reality is our abdomen is cylindrical. This method will build lean, strong muscles.

WHAT ABOUT THE EMOTIONAL BENEFITS OF BUTI?

The movement involved in BUTI yoga focuses on removing obstacles to our first and second chakras. The power that originates in these chakras often gets muted, resulting in tight hips and closed minds. BUTI yoga follows the lead of many cultures – such as Native American and African tribes, that have dance rituals using hip and pelvic spiraling. So in BUTI, you’ll sweat with intention, seeking both physical and emotional benefits.

GOT ANY TIPS FOR ME?

Wear yoga clothes and prepare to sweat – A LOT (no heat is even necessary!!). Drink water before, during, and after the process. Obey your body when it needs a break; it’s always okay to take a different movement or pose, or to simply rest. Share energy, strength, and a few giggles with your tribe (aka, your classmates).

Most importantly, you’re gonna have to leave your judgment at the door. Yes, you’ll be doing some movements you’ve never done before. And yes, it’s going to feel weird and scary at first. But if you can commit to celebrating yourself exactly as you are in this moment, you’ll find a community of fellow warriors willing to lift you up.

At some point, you’ll stop wondering what everyone thinks of your gyrations and simply enjoy the freedom to move in new ways. Though you may not instantly love everything about your body, I have a feeling you’ll feel much more at ease with yourself.

acroyoga fundamentals

All About AcroYoga

Acroyoga is a form of partner yoga that combines yoga, acrobatics, and Thai massage. Among the two-person team, the person doing the lifting is called the base and the person being lifted is the flyer.

Why We Love Acroyoga:

This joyful practice is about having fun and challenging your body and mind in a new, fresh way. Often, we get so stuck in our daily rut of work, household chores, and family responsibilities that we fail to bring play and joy into our lives. And, let’s face it, we can take our yoga practice very seriously at times.

But in Acroyoga, laughter is a regular, consistent component, brought together by the natural playfulness of bringing two energies together on one mat. The great thing about acroyoga is that it’s a form of building each other up – in the most literal sense.

Acroyoga is for Everyone (No Experience is Required):

One of the first responses we hear when holding an acroyoga class is “I could never do that!” Actually, YES you can. Just like traditional yoga, acro accepts you where you are and guides you through the necessary building blocks at whatever pace you need. Sure, some background with flexibility and strength makes the physicality of acro easier, but it’s definitely not a requirement. Acroyoga is physically demanding, but the communication you have with your partner is equally as important to helping you be successful.

The Best Partner for Acroyoga:

You may think that larger people do the lifting and smaller people do the flying; or that men lift and women fly. Not necessarily the case. You’ll find that technique is much more important than strength.

Honestly, the best partner in acroyoga is someone you can laugh with! I totally understand the intimidation factor that comes with this practice, so having an adventure buddy by your side will help you take that leap into an exciting new world of play and fitness. Whether it’s a stranger turned best friend, a significant other, or a sister – whoever you have the most fun with will be your best acro partner.

The Biggest Challenge in Acroyoga:

Hands down, the biggest challenge students of acroyoga face is trust. Our society is conditioned to tackle our tasks independently, stubbornly refusing to rely on others. Acro flips that norm on its head, creating a fun, safe space to return to the basics of what makes a strong community. You’re forced to have faith in one another, clearly and directly communicate your needs, learn to work together, and then fly – together.

Not only will you learn the basics of Acroyoga but you’ll learn to trust your own strength and balance. You have to give up some control when flying, but surrendering to the balance of your base offers a peace you can’t get anywhere else.

Are You Ready to Fly?

We’re hosting our Acroyoga workshops throughout the year, be sure to subscribe to be in the know on our next fly sesh. In this partner based offering, we’ll explore basic stretches and partner drills, along with therapeutic flying, simple L basing, and standing poses. Rest assured, you will also learn partner safety and how to spot these poses with others! This 90-minute workshop is all about having fun and allowing yourself to play with new friends and old. Bring your sweetie, friend, or brother and let’s freakin’ fly!

 

YogaFever Clean & Safety Protocol

At YogaFever, we value the relationships we have built with our customers, community and our team members over the years. And we know that you rely on us to protect your health and safety while you are in our facility.

At this critical moment, your health is our highest priority. The fight against the virus of 2020 is not over, and we are committed to doing our part to prevent the spread of this disease in our community.

Working in close consultation with medical experts and health officials, YogaFever has developed a comprehensive set of protocols that meet or exceed the guidelines.

Below is a high-level overview of how YogaFever has reopened which we call “YogaFever Clean”. While not all inclusive, this summary will give you an overview of the comprehensive efforts we are taking as a small business to protect your health and safety all the while creating a plan that makes sense. Our staff is thoroughly trained on these protocols and plan, and we have applied these protocols consistently and aggressively.

YogaFever Clean represents a new way of doing business for us. And while we are committed to delivering the great service you’ve come to expect from us, your safety – and the safety of our team members – must be our highest priority during these unprecedented times.

YogaFever Cleaning Protocol in Response to the Virus Outbreak 2020:

HEALTH/HYGIENE

  • Do not touch your face or facemask
  • Regular hand washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds should be done  after sneezing, coughing, or nose blowing, after using the restroom.
  • If soap and water are not available, use a (60% min) alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Sanitizing stations are installed logically throughout the studio.
  • YogaFever IC and STUDENTS must conduct health checks daily.  Do not come to the studio to work out sick.
  1. Do you have a fever?
  2. Do you have respiratory symptoms?
  3. If sick, seek care through your primary health provider.
  4. If found to have the virus of 2020, all ICs and students should immediately self-report and notify the owner Shannon Austin at info@yogafevergr.com (616) 805-3603.

INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS

All mats and bikes are 6 feet – 8 feet apart from person to person.

In our common area, please wear your mask at all times. You are required to wear a face mask upon entering.

Only wear gloves when cleaning.  Gloves spread germs. Students should not wear gloves.

Each class will open doors 10 minutes prior to class.  Weather permitting, the external doors will be propped open before and after class for one less touch area.

HOW TO ENTER THE STUDIO

  • Please pre-register and pre pay for every class as size will be limited due to spacial distancing.  You will be charged automatically for a NO SHOW the value of the class which is $25 regardless of your membership level.  So, if you have an unlimited memberships and “no show” you will be charged $25.  If you booked a drop in and “no show”, that drop in class fee will be utilized.  There are no refunds for “no show”.  You have a window of 3 hour to cancel class with no penalty. Most studios are asking for 6 – 24 hours notice to not be charged a fee, we are simply asking for one hour to allow another member to slip in last minute.
  • There will be no lost and found.
  • Wash your hands.
  • Use the touch free check in station with your key card upon arrival.
  • All weights and bands will be utilized in barre and sculpt classes. Those props will be sanitized before the class. After your class, leave props at your designated space to be fully sanitized by our team.
  • Our HVAC system is brand new throughout the entire facility. That includes all duct work, vents, and ventilation. We have 2 extremely high tech Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV) units that measure CO2 levels throughout the space and filters the air inside. When a certain level of CO2 is met, the ERV motor turns on and exhausts air out of the room and supplies fresh air from the outside in. We have had these adjusted and turned on so that stagnant air is exhausting continuously and fresh air is continuously is being supplied. This is important as we are constantly cleansing the air inside the studio spaces and common areas. Our engineers have configured that with this adjustment our studio spaces including common areas are flushing 100% of the air every hour.
  • Several classes will be live streamed to support our online community. These classes will not be able to be viewed later. They are booked the same way that a regular in studio class is booked but will say “live stream” when you book.
  • Studio C for spin classes will have regular in studio classes with teachers throughout the day with a limited capacity. While the studio does not have a live teacher, we will run $10 community classes that can be used by members for free where there will be YouTube classes played every hour on the hour. This means even if you cannot access a class with a teacher in studio, you still a “virtual in studio” RIDE. This may be more convenient for some as you can come with a small group and do a studio “take over” to get in your daily burn or just come alone and have the state of the art equipment to ride on with more privacy. All bikes will be heavily sanitized before and after each use.

CLEANING PROTOCOL

YogaFever has secured medical grade commercial cleaners, hand sanitizers, foggers, and cleaning protocol.

Yoga Studio, Barre Studio, and Spin Studio (after every class)

  • Wipe down all surfaces wall to wall
  • Wipe and sanitize all light switches and doors
  • Mop wall to wall with medical grade commercial cleaner
  • Foggers are used between classes to sanitize the air, floors and walls
  • Deep clean entrance, restrooms and common Area (2x day for retail, hourly for restrooms)
  • Sweep and mop wall to wall. Sanitize all walls, light switches and doors
  • Clean restroom fixtures, mirrors, door handles, counters
  • Sanitize all glass surfaces
  • Vacuum Walk off mats
  • Dust and Sanitize all low reach areas
  • Dust and Sanitize all high reach areas

*The sole purpose of this is to provide information about the safety of our facility. This information is not intended for use in the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of any disease. If you suspect you may have an illness or the virus of 2020, please consult your medical practitioner immediately.

Building a springtime routine

Building Your Springtime Routine through Yoga, Nutrition, and Sleeping Patterns

Last week we dove into the basic principles of an Ayurvedic approach to spring. We talked about how the kapha dosha is aggravated by qualities that are heavy, cold, or moist, so we encouraged you to begin inviting in lightness, warmth and dryness through the food, activities, and self-care rituals you choose to engage in.

We determined that the best prescription is to develop a rhythm. In this season, you’re looking to identify a set of routines that help you gradually lighten your body, mind, and emotions.

Today, I dive into what your yoga practice, eating habits, and sleeping patterns might look like when following an Ayurvedic approach to spring.

Your Yoga Practice

Your practice this time of year should be stimulating and invigorating. I’ve seen our Yoga Fever instructors begin to ramp up their classes, filling them with high-energy, powerful flows.

However, I highly recommend an inclusion of both yin and yang classes this time of year. Cultivating both strength and flexibility will bring balance to the kapha dosha. Move rapidly through your sequences this time of year, but linger in the moments between. Use those opportunities to slow down and move mindfully.

When practicing at home, try some of these poses:

Sun Salutations- These sequences pump prana – or breath – through your body, filling you with oxygen. Move rapidly through these sequences, linking breath to movement, to relieve stagnation in your body and mind.

Backbends- Any heart opening asana will energize your body. Bridge pose, wheel, and wild thing all expand your chest, relieving any congestion in your respiratory system.

Dynamic forward folds- Whether seated or standing, forward folds tone your kidneys and bladder, regulating your body’s water content and emotions.

Twists- Wringing your body out through a variety of twists – like triangle pose – really detoxifies your organs and strengthens your metabolic fire. Talk about a thorough spring cleaning!

Nutritional Advice

In the winter months, we naturally gravitate toward sweet, sour, or salty foods to counteract the dry qualities of these bitterly cold months. Now that the temperatures are rising, eat lighter foods, focusing on pungent, bitter, and astringent tastes.

Make sure that lunch is your biggest meal of the day, so you’re not forcing your body to digest a large meal during the times of the day when your kapha dosha is sluggish. Also, aim to eat at regular intervals during the day, at least 3-4 hours between meals.

Best foods to eat this season:

Saute leafy greens – kale, collards, dandelion, spinach, or mustard greens – with ghee to cleanse your body and counterbalance congestion.

Opt for less sweet fruits, like cherries, blueberries, grapefruit, or granny smith apples.

Choose seeds instead of nuts.

Barley, quinoa, and millet should be your staple grains.

Kick up your seasoning game with spices like turmeric, ginger, cayenne, mustard, and black pepper.

Adjusting Your Sleeping Patterns

Before the sun reaches its ultimate summer equinox point, take advantage of the darkness and fight the urge to stay up late. You’ll have plenty of time to milk those hours come June.

To keep your kapha dosha in balance, go to bed by 10:00 p.m. and rise before the sun. Have you ever noticed that it’s actually easier to wake up at 5:30 a.m. than 6:30 a.m.? Providing you went to bed early!

When you do wake up, use those hours before the rest of the world wakes to get outside for a brisk walk or incorporate a vigorous yoga practice. We’d love to see you at our 6:00 a.m. hot yoga classes!

stillness

STILLNESS

Interestingly enough, one of the reasons we practice poses, or ‘asanas,’ in yoga is to help our bodies become supple enough to do the opposite: to sit in stillness and meditation.

Take a minute to think about the last time you sat in complete stillness, without wondering what you were going to cook for dinner or how you were going to accomplish all your weekend activities. We’ve talked before on the blog about busyness and the way yoga and breath can decrease stress, depression, and anxiety, but today I want to focus on one of the hardest components of yoga: stillness.

Stillness is a skill. And like any skill, it takes practice.

WHY IS IT SO DIFFICULT TO BE STILL?

Often, we’re instructed to “relax” and sink into a resting pose. As many of us can attest, “just relaxing” is a complex request. When we stop thinking about our breath, legs, core, and post-yoga plans, all kinds of scary thoughts can creep up to the surface. Mindful stillness is so challenging, you guys – even for the most experienced yogis.

Over time, our busy lives leave us feeling exhausted, frustrated, and out of control. Yet, being alone with our deeper thoughts can be painful – so we tend to do whatever necessary to avoid moments of stillness. We add in activities and accept additional projects at work; we watch tv or turn on music when we’re home alone. While none of these activities are wrong in themselves, refusing to grant ourselves moments of genuine rest reduces our coping skills, sense of self, and even our relationships.

HOW CAN WE PRACTICE STILLNESS?

This is why we infuse our yoga practice with moments of rest. We use child’s pose, sukhasana (an easy seat), mountain pose, and, of course, savasana to coax our bodies into stillness. Yes, it’s great to get active, to warm up the body, and to get nice and sweaty, but it’s equally important to do the opposite: create quiet and peace within the body.

The pause we take during these poses is not about falling asleep, hanging out, or waiting for the next movement. The pause is designed to foster a full awareness of our body and the way things are right now. We witness our breath flowing through our limbs, the way our heart beats, and the changes and evolutions that our bodies and minds go through.

When we do this, we experience an emotional release – from the day, from our stress or anxieties, from difficult relationships, and any multitude of other daily circumstances.

CREATING STILLNESS OFF THE MAT

Though we often are forced into moments of stillness when we step onto our mat, we don’t always allow our bodies and minds to totally obey, still retracting to those pesky thoughts and concerns. Not only do we each have room to improve on the mat, but we also need to put this into practice in our daily lives.

I know, adding time into your daily life for stillness sounds daunting if not downright impossible. Start small, with only five minutes of focused inactivity. Maybe you set your alarm for five minutes earlier each morning and spend some time in meditation or prayer. Or block out a five minute break at work and find an empty room with no distractions. Or commit to staying off your phone in the half hour leading up to bedtime to make stillness at night easier.

Whatever you attempt, remember that your mind will continually try to rebel – but with practice you can help quiet it.

Find time for rest. You totally deserve it.

 

How does a private yoga lesson work?

How Does a Private Yoga Lesson Work?

What is a private yoga lesson?

A private yoga session is a one-on-one yoga lesson with a skilled and trained Registered Yoga Teacher. During a private yoga class together you can focus on your specific needs. Some like to go the private yoga route to learn the basics as a beginner before they throw themselves into a group setting or are healing an injury back to health. Others may just prefer personalized instruction even though they have been practicing the art of yoga for several years.

If you are a beginner, healing an injury or just prefer one-on-one attention, a private yoga lesson may be a good fit. A group setting may be overwhelming if any of the above applies to you.

What is the cost of a private session?

Pricing for yoga varies for private instruction from city to city and state to state. For example, a private session in the Midwest should range anywhere from $75 – $125 per hour. On the East or West Coast that price doubles if not triples depending on how well known the teacher is! I know, right? That does not mean that just because a teacher is popular on social channels that they are a great teacher. That just means they know how to market themselves well. On the other hand, there are several renowned teachers with a lot of cred that people would pay big bucks to train with because, well to put it bluntly.. they know their shit. In general, when looking for a private, you want to be sure that the teacher has a few years of experience if not more teaching yoga.

Is a private session right for me?

This is a question that only you can answer. If you prefer a more intimate setting with a vetted instructor than a private yoga lesson will serve you very well. If you are a beginner that is just plain unsure about this whole yoga thing, than maybe a private yoga session is best for you. If you are healing an injury and you are using the private yoga class as a source of physical therapy, than it may be just the ticket.

Can I take just one private yoga class or do I need to schedule several?

Great question. This is entirely up to you. At Yoga Fever, we recommend taking one private yoga class initially. See how it feels in your body during and after. Reflect on how your teacher served you and if you jive with them in general.

Call the studio for more information or to schedule your private yoga class with a qualified RYT (Registered Yoga Teacher). ~ (616) 805-3603 or visit our personal training page within our website and contact us.

Hot yoga and diabetes

Hot Yoga and Diabetes

Can I do hot yoga if I have diabetes?

Yes, you can absolutely do hot yoga if you have diabetes. However, being mindful of your blood sugar level and hydration is key. Checking your blood sugar before and after class is a good rule of thumb to measure where your levels are with the incorporation of vigorous heated exercise.

Your glucose level may spike after a hot yoga class due to the stress on the body, heat and humidity. Since Diabetes varies in degree and from person to person, it is important to begin a hot yoga routine with a keen eye on your body, how you feel after class, and checking your insulin levels.

Take the time to rest after class if you have Diabetes

Don’t rush to get out the door to head home if you are finishing up a hot yoga class and you are diabetic. Give it a few minutes, relax, linger, take your time! Replenish as much fluids as you can before you get behind the wheel to head home. If you feel light headed, disoriented, or out of sorts in anyway, you should stay put and talk to someone at the studio about how your feeling. They can help you to find a relaxing location where you can check your insulin levels and rest your head.

Consult your physician

Talking to your Doc before incorporating hot yoga into your routine is always a good idea but especially if you are type I or type II diabetic. Be sure that this is a safe practice for you by getting the green light from your primary care.

Exercise is a natural healer

Hot yoga, running, traditional yoga, and exercise of any kind is a natural healer of the body and mind. If you check with your doc and monitor yourself closely, there should be nothing holding you back from picking up a regular hot yoga routine.

Congrats on getting healthy!

What is Vinyasa Yoga

What is Vinyasa Yoga?

Vinyasa Yoga 101

So you’ve taken a Vinyasa Class and may have even heard your favorite teacher call out “take your Vinyasa”. This can be confusing. The term Vinyasa actually has a few different meanings that are used quite frequently and are not mutually exclusive.

The word Vinyasa can be translated into arranging something in a special way, such as yoga poses. Vinyasa is one of many different styles of yoga and is a practice where we link the breath with movement. We coordinate and flow poses together from one pose to the next and do each set of poses on each side of the body.

Before transitioning to the other side of the body we hear the teacher call out “take your Vinyasa” or “take your Chatarunga”. This means that we move through the transitioning poses of Downdog, Plank, Cobra/Updog, and then back to Downdog to neutralize the body before beginning the other side. These transitional poses are part of the tradition of yoga and have been practiced this way for thousands of years. So again, linking poses together using the breath. These 4 poses are linked together as transitions and are considered a “Vinyasa”.

Vinyasa is one of the most popular styles of yoga

We understand why Vinyasa has become so popular. It’s a momentum style practice that burns calories, kicks up your heart rate, AND builds strength and flexibility. I mean.. hello?? What’s not to love here?

By consciously flowing with breath and movement we anchor ourselves in the present moment. It is often referred to in classical yoga as the “breathing system”.

Vinyasa Classes are always different

There is a ton of variety in Vinyasa Classes. Normally, no two classes are the same. Teachers choreograph and link together poses that open certain areas of the body. Some days you may work hips and quads, other days shoulders, core or low back. Some days, you get a mixed bag where you get a little bit of everything! Almost certain though, you will get a spine lengthening and strengthening session regardless if you work the upper or lower body. All yoga poses revolve around the axis of the spine.

There is a saying in yoga…

‘Age is not defined by a number but by the flexibility of your spine’

We agree wholeheartedly~

There are many styles of yoga to explore

Hatha yoga is a set of postures for physical and mental exercise used to open up the channels of the body. “Ha” means sun and “tha” means moon. We balance the sun (masculine) and moon (feminine) energies of the body to develop strength and flexibility. This is a transformation style of yoga that focuses on the 8 limbs of yoga designed by Patanjali, the Father of Yoga.

Restorative yoga is where we utilize gravity and many props to hold poses for long periods of time. These poses are normally close to the ground or practiced on the belly, seat or back. It is the opposite of a “yang” practice which revolves around dynamic energy. This practice is meant to offer up more stillness and challenge the mind by slowing down.

Ashtanga yoga was the first style of yoga and is the foundation that all yoga derived. It was developed by Sri K. Pattabhi Jois in the early 1900’s. Ashtanga is a progressive set of postures or asanas that is linked together with the breath to induce an internal heat that purifies the muscles and organs. It is the same set of postures each time. This yoga creates a strong body and calm mind. There are 3 sets or series in Ashtanga. The short-form primary series is usually what is taught in most yoga studios that offer Ashtanga.

There are several other types of yoga to explore such as Kundalini, Bhakti, Jiva Mukti and more. Finding the right fit for your lifestyle is key.